Category Archives: About Fossils

Could It Be A Trilobite’s Descendant?

Could it be? Was this “bug” walking through my living room a remnant of the trilobite species? I’d seen pill bugs before, but this bug looked to have LOBES! And three of them at that!

The child inside of me was beyond excited, thrilled…not quantifiable. I hopped onto Google (of course). There I found a TON of info and began to learn so many new things.

I started by searching with the only terms I knew: “roly-poly bug” and “pill bug”. I learned that people all over the US called them by different names. And there were a lot of different species with a wide variety of markings. It was the pale markings on my bug that made it appear to have lobes, which it really did not.

Next, my husband announced that it really couldn’t be a trilobite because all the known species were “assumed” to have lived in water. So I dug a little deeper. Lo and behold, the pillbug, roly-poly (or even sowbug) is not an insect at all…it’s a crustacean! It has gills! I will forever remember these last facts because they are unique, unexpected and the opposite of what I thought I was observing: an insect. But this guy has 7 pairs of legs…and those GILLS!

Why is this so fascinating? I believe I had a childlike moment of learning, something all us teachers hope to inspire. And brought on by a tiny little bug.

You see, this example had all the elements of what we teachers need to inspire learning:

  1. A Eureka moment in which I was driven to figure out if this could really be a unique species of trilobite.
  2. A novel learning moment in which I learned that this “bug” was no insect; rathe a crustacean with 7pairs of legs, and GILLS!
  3. Comparable/compatible information that helped me understand my curiosity: besides looking like a trilobite, they also behave like a trilobite. When they are moving, their little legs hold up the “shell” and when touched, they roll into a tight ball.

All in all, it was a perfect (personal) example of what great learning can be.

What sort of amazement will you inspire in your students today?

Elrathia Kingii

Digging Trilobites At U-Dig Fossils

How’d you like to split an ordinary-looking gray rock and find this beauty? You can at

U-Dig  Fossils near Delta, Utah in western Millard County.

The quarry is literally acres of Wheeler Shale, laid down during the Cambrian Period approximately 507 million years ago. Trilobites were prolific inhabitants of the Cambrian seas that covered the planet. This species, the Elrathia Kingii, shows up between layers of the shale.

When you arrive at the quarry, you’re handed a bucket and a hammer to help gently tap on the shale to split the layers. It’s fairly common to find pieces of incomplete trilobites. On the day we visited, several really nice whole trilobites were found…but not by us.

To be fair, we didn’t spend much time splitting rocks. We arrived at the quarry late in the morning on what was a pretty hot summer day. We recommend you keep an eye on the temperatures, because this is the desert and by late morning temperatures can be brutal.

The Crapo family runs the U-Dig Fossil Site. We met and worked with the patriarch of the family in 2005. For the next 12 years of so, Loy Crapo, whose business is called The Bug House, supplied us with a variety of Elrathia kingii fossils of various sizes and levels of completion. After Loy passed away, his widow, sons, daughters, and their families continued the Bug House business and do so until today.

The Bug House isn’t just about trilobites, in fact, their bigger business is in two beautiful crystal specimens: Septarian nodules and Dugway geodes.

We spoke with Shayne Crapo who runs the U-Dig Fossils quarry. Shayne recommends visitors:

It is adviseable to bring a pair of gloves (garden gloves are sufficient), safety glasses and a light jacket in the event there is a change of weather. Remember to bring plenty of food and water. Please bring a container to transport your fossils home. It is always good to bring a spare tire as well.

We will be open 6 days closed on Sunday, hours of operation 9 AM – 6 PM. “Closed on Sundays and 4 July, we are open on most holidays except for Sundays”. Please feel free to call to make sure what days we are open, and check the calendar just in case. If you get there early just wait for us at the gate and we will be there promptly.

Business hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Please arrive at the quarry before 4 PM because the quarry will close early if no one is present at 4 p.m. Please do not attempt to enter the quarry when it is closed.

Directions– The U-DIG Fossils Quarry is located approximately 52 miles west of Delta, Utah, near Antelope Springs. It is approximately 90 miles from Provo to Delta. It is approximately 130 miles from Salt Lake City to Delta.

Once in Delta, first travel 32 miles west on Highway 6 / 50. At the Long Ridge Reservoir sign between mile markers 56-57, turn right. There is a U-DIG Fossils sign at this intersection. Then travel 20 miles down a well-maintained gravel road to reach the U-DIG Quarry. Any type of vehicle can travel this gravel road.

Costs

Elrathia kingii Trilobite

Hours-hours of operation 9 AM – 6 PM. “Closed on Sundays and 4 July, we are open on most holidays except for Sundays”. Please feel free to call to make sure what days we are open

Season-1 April – 30 Oct

 

Claudia's Ginko Fossil

What’s Your Favorite Fossil?

Inevitably, when I’m talking fossils, folks drop the name of their favorite. Do you have one? Just one?

My passion for fossils grew out of my love for playing in natural settings. I was one of those lucky kids who was NOT a “last child in the woods”.  I grew up in a place and time where the creek just down the road between my house and the abandoned farm was the best playground through all the seasons.

The creek was where I began to notice, learn, and develop a passion for my favorite leaf-shape variations:  the ones that signaled berries would arrive in a month or two and the ones to be avoided.

The creek was where I found my first rock treasures, filling my shelves with equal quantities of rocks and books. We stumbled across crazy shapes in the rocks, only to learn many years later, that these were the fossilized remains of ancient Ordovician and Silurian sea creatures. Most of our rocks contained common shapes: bryozoan, brachiopods, and crinoids. The trilobite, common during those geologic periods and which occupied my “favorite fossil’ status, but didn’t find its way into my personal collection for many years.

But then I discovered the gingko! A huge old  tree graced the entry to my first Montessori school and captured my heart for its simple and unique fan-shaped leaves and stinky fruit. When I learned it was a “living fossil” whose origins went back as far as 270 million years, I was totally smitten! The ginkgo quickly rose to the top of my “favorite fossil” list. No big surprise that this special find at last year’s gem and fossil show had to come home with me!

Is there a trilobite, a gingko, or ???? in your life?

Morocco at Last!

We were nearly drip-dried after standing in the beating rain to get onto our aircraft in London. The dry, early afternoon heat was a welcome completion to the process. Met by our Italian host for our time in Marrakech, he wove his way to the center of the old city and the oldest Medina in Morocco. He told us the huge mosque that we could see (and hear) from our Riad, was the third most important mosque to the Muslim faithful.

Our car was met by a Moroccan “bell boy” who carried our suitcases down ancient, narrow streets. We both felt a little nervous about what might lay behind the door. We needn’t have been. The Riad, which means a building with a central garden courtyard, was stunning. The walls were decorated with fossils, and our excitement for the hunting to come began to build. Our hostess served us the first of many daily teas. No matter when you sit down to a meal, or even when you just meet a friend, tea will always accompany the moment.

Our room looked out on the Riad below. Everywhere were special touches of Moroccan beauty and special effort was made to enhance the fragrance of the air with warm oils and rose petals. Our first day in Morocco was filled with sights and sounds never before experienced.

It’s Not Just a Trilobite; It’s a Flexicalymene!

Trilobites are one of the most beloved Paleozoic Era fossil specimens. They are found all around the globe because they lived during a time when most of the land was covered by ancient seas.  For more information about Trilobites and a few pictures which can be downloaded to color, take a look at our sister site:  www.fossils-facts-and-finds.com. 

Trilobites made their entrance onto the earth’s stage during the late Cambrian Period. This is the first and oldest division of the Paleozoic Era.  The rock layers belonging to this time period were first identified near Cambria or modern-day Wales. It’s easy to see how the period got its name! 

The divisions of the Paleozoic Era that follow the Cambrian are the Ordovician, the Silurian, the Devonian, and the Permian periods.  If you look up the meanings of these names, you’ll find that they, too, were named for the location associated with the layers of rock that were laid down so many million years ago. 

When you think of these periods like rock layers it can be helpful to imagine a cake with 5 layers: a cake layer on the bottom (Cambrian), an icing layer (Ordovician), cake again (Silurian), icing again (Devonian) and ending with a cake layer on top (Permian). That’s just the end of the Paleozoic Era! It is followed by the Mesozoic Era that would add three more layers, and then the Cenozoic Era with three more! That’s a lot of layers…and it’s only the layers that represent the time since there has been life on earth. To include the millions of years before that would be another entire group of layers! 

In modern times, more than 5000 different trilobite genera have been named. If you really want to get into trilobites, you should check out http://www.trilobites.info/ This site, created and monitored by Dr. Sam Gon III,  is literally hundreds of pages of information about trilobites….we think it’s the best anywhere! 

The particular genus and species pictured here is the flexicalymene ouzregui. It lived during the most recent part of the Ordovician period or about 449 million years ago. It is a species commonly found in Morocco, near the city of Erfoud, where many Paleozoic Era fossils are commonly found. 

If you love this trilobite, and would like to have one for your very own, you can find one here: Flexicalymene Trilobite

OMG! It’s a REAL (fossil) Glyptodont!

A few years back, in my ongoing work to share prehistory with excited kids, I created a Montessori material (LINK) that included a Doedicurus, an herbivore that lived during the Pleistocene epoch.

A mammal with a carapace (like a turtle) and a spiked knot at the end of its tail (like the Ankylosaurus that lived during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods), this creature wowed me when I discovered it among a new set of prehistoric toys. It was such an odd mix of body parts that seemed to come out of nowhere; impossible to believe that such a creature could have existed. After all, when fossils are found it is no sure thing that all the parts present even belong to the same animal. It just seemed too odd, too remarkable to believe, even after google searches confirmed their historical reality.

But this article is not about the oddly characterized creature. You can find that with a quick google search. Rather, my goal is to share the amazement and joy of a modern-day travel discovery.

The fossilicious team recently visited the Galerie de paléontologie et d’anatomie comparée (LINK http://www.mnhn.fr/fr/visitez/lieux/galerie-paleontologie-anatomie-comparee). This museum alone will call us back to Paris, a city we have just begun to discover and adore! Not your typical museum of natural history, this truly is a place of comparative anatomy. If there is another museum on the planet that has such a voluminous collection on display, I’d truly love to hear about it! (write me at claudiamann “at” fossilicious.com.)

Paris was actually a “side-trip” on our way home from our primary destination: Morocco. We had dreamed of visiting the fossil beds where so many of our collections originate for years and, at last, the trip was becoming a reality. But the Galerie de paléontologie et d’anatomie comparée had been just a bit further down on our bucket list, so why not add just a couple of days as we made our way back to the USA?

Cases of bones that greeted us upon entry let us know that we were in a very special place. With every step deeper into the museum, we realized that we couldn’t possibly “take in” this museum in the time we had. So we tried desperately to focus on an overview of what was there, vowing to return as soon as our pocketbooks would allow.

glyptodont.tail
It was on the second floor, the Paleontologie collection, where I spotted my first glyptodont. I stood face-to-face with the bones and tightly woven scutes of the carapace: evidence that these creatures truly roamed the earth once upon a Pleistocene time. For this lover of prehistory and paleobiology, the thrill rivaled the moment, having successfully split open a chuck of Florissant fossil bed rock, I uncovered a complete Eocene leaf. In other words, it was magnificent!
glyptodont

The rush that comes with this kind of discovery should not be underestimated. Books inspire us, develop a sense of wonder, and lead us to investigate our passions. Standing next to the real thing…well, that’s an emotion for which books can only prime us.