Monthly Archives: July 2019

July 17 and 24th: A Class In Cosmic Education

Montessori’s Cosmic Education and the story of the universe grabbed hold of my heart and never let go. Learning to inspire curiosity, wonder and connection to our celestial home has been my quest throughout 30 years of teaching. This week and next, I’ll be sharing some of my ideas and strategies in two 90-minute sessions of online and hands-on learning.

I opened a book of poetry written by a class of elementary II students I worked with in 1999. Their words reflected the intertwining of academic learning, going out, and following their passions.

Shark
He was a soldier as he planned his attack.
His eyes flashed like lightning
While he wept for his prey.
(C.H., 11 years)

My memory of the year has faded too greatly to remember the details of weaving the threads of biology, ecology, language, and math, but their poetry and the drawings that graced the pages of the book they’d created brought back the vivaciousness of those students. These were children who’d gone to the Grand Canyon in the spring and, upon returning, decided to build a model of the layers into our classroom. The poem’s authoris the same child who exclaimed with great excitement that they could use the clinometer to determine the height of their model, reflecting the way they had used the instrument to calculate the heights of the distant sides of the canyon. This “proof” of meaningful learning moved my soul then as it does now.

This week, I’ll be sharing ideas for Keeping Cosmic Education at the Heart of your Classroom. We’ll explore ways of thinking about your curriculum to knit together experiences in all the skills-based subjects as well as art, music, and practical life activities. We’ll consider the whole, distill it into parts, and return to the whole to give you a template for sharing your Montessori lessons in ways that develop elementary and secondary students into adults who see themselves within the context of the cosmic plan. I hope you’ll join me!

For information on attending follow this link: Cosmic Education Class

Elrathia Kingii

Digging Trilobites At U-Dig Fossils

How’d you like to split an ordinary-looking gray rock and find this beauty? You can at

U-Dig  Fossils near Delta, Utah in western Millard County.

The quarry is literally acres of Wheeler Shale, laid down during the Cambrian Period approximately 507 million years ago. Trilobites were prolific inhabitants of the Cambrian seas that covered the planet. This species, the Elrathia Kingii, shows up between layers of the shale.

When you arrive at the quarry, you’re handed a bucket and a hammer to help gently tap on the shale to split the layers. It’s fairly common to find pieces of incomplete trilobites. On the day we visited, several really nice whole trilobites were found…but not by us.

To be fair, we didn’t spend much time splitting rocks. We arrived at the quarry late in the morning on what was a pretty hot summer day. We recommend you keep an eye on the temperatures, because this is the desert and by late morning temperatures can be brutal.

The Crapo family runs the U-Dig Fossil Site. We met and worked with the patriarch of the family in 2005. For the next 12 years of so, Loy Crapo, whose business is called The Bug House, supplied us with a variety of Elrathia kingii fossils of various sizes and levels of completion. After Loy passed away, his widow, sons, daughters, and their families continued the Bug House business and do so until today.

The Bug House isn’t just about trilobites, in fact, their bigger business is in two beautiful crystal specimens: Septarian nodules and Dugway geodes.

We spoke with Shayne Crapo who runs the U-Dig Fossils quarry. Shayne recommends visitors:

It is adviseable to bring a pair of gloves (garden gloves are sufficient), safety glasses and a light jacket in the event there is a change of weather. Remember to bring plenty of food and water. Please bring a container to transport your fossils home. It is always good to bring a spare tire as well.

We will be open 6 days closed on Sunday, hours of operation 9 AM – 6 PM. “Closed on Sundays and 4 July, we are open on most holidays except for Sundays”. Please feel free to call to make sure what days we are open, and check the calendar just in case. If you get there early just wait for us at the gate and we will be there promptly.

Business hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Please arrive at the quarry before 4 PM because the quarry will close early if no one is present at 4 p.m. Please do not attempt to enter the quarry when it is closed.

Directions– The U-DIG Fossils Quarry is located approximately 52 miles west of Delta, Utah, near Antelope Springs. It is approximately 90 miles from Provo to Delta. It is approximately 130 miles from Salt Lake City to Delta.

Once in Delta, first travel 32 miles west on Highway 6 / 50. At the Long Ridge Reservoir sign between mile markers 56-57, turn right. There is a U-DIG Fossils sign at this intersection. Then travel 20 miles down a well-maintained gravel road to reach the U-DIG Quarry. Any type of vehicle can travel this gravel road.

Costs

Elrathia kingii Trilobite

Hours-hours of operation 9 AM – 6 PM. “Closed on Sundays and 4 July, we are open on most holidays except for Sundays”. Please feel free to call to make sure what days we are open

Season-1 April – 30 Oct