Monthly Archives: May 2019

Morocco at Last!

We were nearly drip-dried after standing in the beating rain to get onto our aircraft in London. The dry, early afternoon heat was a welcome completion to the process. Met by our Italian host for our time in Marrakech, he wove his way to the center of the old city and the oldest Medina in Morocco. He told us the huge mosque that we could see (and hear) from our Riad, was the third most important mosque to the Muslim faithful.

Our car was met by a Moroccan “bell boy” who carried our suitcases down ancient, narrow streets. We both felt a little nervous about what might lay behind the door. We needn’t have been. The Riad, which means a building with a central garden courtyard, was stunning. The walls were decorated with fossils, and our excitement for the hunting to come began to build. Our hostess served us the first of many daily teas. No matter when you sit down to a meal, or even when you just meet a friend, tea will always accompany the moment.

Our room looked out on the Riad below. Everywhere were special touches of Moroccan beauty and special effort was made to enhance the fragrance of the air with warm oils and rose petals. Our first day in Morocco was filled with sights and sounds never before experienced.

The Montessori Teacher Conference Season is Upon Us! 

 

Spring is rejuvenation time! For us teachers, that means it’s conference season. Since these conferences take place at approximately the same time each year, I thought it might be helpful to my blog followers to know about them for future planning. Some are still on the horizon and you may want to join me at one of them upcoming!

My conference season started outside Chicago this year with the Association of Illinois Montessori Schools. It is a somewhat small conference, which makes it an opportunity for meaningful conversations and up-close-and-personal interactions with the attendees. It was filled with inspirational speakers and fun-loving Montessorians from not only Chicagoland, but exhibitors that came from as far as Florida and California! The later was me! 

Next was the Cincinnati  Montessori Society. I made the Chicago / Cincinnati trip because their close proximity made it easy, but mostly because it was an opportunity to connect with my hometown Montessori friends. My Montessori journey started in Cincinnati. It was also the hometown celebration of our own Marta Donahoe who was the AMS Living Legacy this year. Celebrating Marta was a highlight of this trip! The conference was pretty big as regional conferences go…more than 600 attendees at a beautiful venue. The keynote speaker shared information about gender issues that was timely and informative. I got to focus my geologic presentation on the Ordovician period that is exposed in the region, making it a great spring kick-off for teachers who want to get their students outside looking for the fossils that abound in this area. 

The American Montessori Conference (AMS) has come a LONG way since my first experience in Princeton, NJ in 1993. Starstruck to be presenting new work that year, The Emotional Experience of Learning and Teaching, I remember the conference to be a relatively intimate gathering of probably around 1000. By the time I returned to presenting in 2007, our annual conferences had grown so large that we celebrated the 100-year anniversary of the Casa dei Bambini with our annual meeting at Madison Square Garden in NYC!

It’s the intimacy of those early years and the sharing among colleagues that I cherish, so when the numbers grow, I do my best to recreate the “small-feel” through activities that bring participants together in tiny groupings that encourage collaboration, sharing of ideas, and laughter! The 2019 AMS conference, now called The Montessori Event, was an even greater challenge to create the intimacy I love, but through good-natured and enthusiastic participants, we managed!  Here’s a few photos to confirm the fun! Keep watch for a post on this year’s conference presentation coming next week!

I missed the Calgary conference: Children Change the World…sadly! The speakers were many friends and respected colleagues. I’m putting that one on my list for next year. 

Upcoming, I’ll be in Denver and Victoria, BC in early May. In each of them I’ll be sharing my passion for Cosmic Education with activities to help teachers keep it alive in their classrooms. So many teachers have shared that their hesitation with the CE curriculum is not “knowing” enough. My presentations help dispel that feeling and bring fun and joy to the work! If you’re in the area, or want a nice, low-key and intimate conference, I hope I’ll see you at one of these! 

AMS Conference and Friendship

The Montessori Event in Washington DC was bigger than ever; AMS (the American Montessori Society) really did itself proud! As exhibitors, we often feel like we are limited in how much we get to enjoy all the offerings of the conference, but renewing friendships is always the best part of the conference anyway. This year we made time to socialize with several long-time friends, colleagues and “Montrepreneurs.”

Doug and Lori Karmazin first met more than 30 years ago at the College of New Rochelle, where they were students at the Center for Montessori Teacher Education/New York. This was long before either of them thought about developing their Montessori businesses, but their friendship and their businesses blossomed and endured!

Lori started Great Extensions in 1994 offering just a few materials. Now, along with the beautiful fabric mats and stamping materials, Lori has become known as the “dice lady” at theconferences, offering more than 50 different dice to be used in creative math and language activities. She has 6 pages of specialty dice listed on her website

Her beautiful materials have been in every classroom we’ve opened since the early 2000’s. The math mats make it easy for young students to complete math activities from basic counting, to simple operations to advanced operations in decimals. The math and language stamps help students record problems and are a wonderful bridge between manipulations of the concrete materials and abstract paper and pencil work.

You can visit Great Extensions at http://www.great-extensions.com/index.html.