Monthly Archives: May 2017

It’s Vacation Time!

 

Know how you feel when your principal asks you to add materials to your curriculum? For some, it goes something like this: “UGH! REALLY? You want me to add to a curriculum I already can’t get through?”

 

I know this, because I’ve been a Montessori school leader for years and I’ve seen it on the faces of teachers both under my direction and as colleagues. I’m sure the expression has appeared on my face as well.

 

And it’s time for vacation already! Please don’t ask me to plan for next year!

 

I’m here to suggest that you plan that vacation with a vengeance! Go somewhere truly exciting, interesting, fun, and relaxing. Get into the place. Discover the undiscovered secrets waiting to be found. Eat some new cuisine. Buy some spices so you can enjoy it back home. Take photos…lots of them! Find exotic souvenirs and, of course, new clothes!

 

Then bring it all back to your students! Voila! That curriculum assignment? Done! Piece of cake! (perhaps literally!)

 

Since I’m a prehistory nerd… particularly a fossil-nerd, that’s just what I did recently. We took a trip to Morocco. I brought back fossils, cuisine to share, customs to practice, and tons of photos. Our young students loved the experiences I brought back from my time spent in deserts, exotic towns, fossil beds, and surprising museums. (Check out this article of the one we discovered in Paris.)

 

With a little creativity and some time upon your return, you’ll not only have that curriculum development all set, but you’ll get to relive your vacation memories until next summer comes around…when you can do it all over again!

 

PS-Want to see a few examples? Comming soon, some pics from what I brought back to share.

OMG! It’s a REAL (fossil) Glyptodont!

A few years back, in my ongoing work to share prehistory with excited kids, I created a Montessori material (LINK) that included a Doedicurus, an herbivore that lived during the Pleistocene epoch.

A mammal with a carapace (like a turtle) and a spiked knot at the end of its tail (like the Ankylosaurus that lived during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods), this creature wowed me when I discovered it among a new set of prehistoric toys. It was such an odd mix of body parts that seemed to come out of nowhere; impossible to believe that such a creature could have existed. After all, when fossils are found it is no sure thing that all the parts present even belong to the same animal. It just seemed too odd, too remarkable to believe, even after google searches confirmed their historical reality.

But this article is not about the oddly characterized creature. You can find that with a quick google search. Rather, my goal is to share the amazement and joy of a modern-day travel discovery.

The fossilicious team recently visited the Galerie de paléontologie et d’anatomie comparée (LINK http://www.mnhn.fr/fr/visitez/lieux/galerie-paleontologie-anatomie-comparee). This museum alone will call us back to Paris, a city we have just begun to discover and adore! Not your typical museum of natural history, this truly is a place of comparative anatomy. If there is another museum on the planet that has such a voluminous collection on display, I’d truly love to hear about it! (write me at claudiamann “at” fossilicious.com.)

Paris was actually a “side-trip” on our way home from our primary destination: Morocco. We had dreamed of visiting the fossil beds where so many of our collections originate for years and, at last, the trip was becoming a reality. But the Galerie de paléontologie et d’anatomie comparée had been just a bit further down on our bucket list, so why not add just a couple of days as we made our way back to the USA?

Cases of bones that greeted us upon entry let us know that we were in a very special place. With every step deeper into the museum, we realized that we couldn’t possibly “take in” this museum in the time we had. So we tried desperately to focus on an overview of what was there, vowing to return as soon as our pocketbooks would allow.

glyptodont.tail
It was on the second floor, the Paleontologie collection, where I spotted my first glyptodont. I stood face-to-face with the bones and tightly woven scutes of the carapace: evidence that these creatures truly roamed the earth once upon a Pleistocene time. For this lover of prehistory and paleobiology, the thrill rivaled the moment, having successfully split open a chuck of Florissant fossil bed rock, I uncovered a complete Eocene leaf. In other words, it was magnificent!
glyptodont

The rush that comes with this kind of discovery should not be underestimated. Books inspire us, develop a sense of wonder, and lead us to investigate our passions. Standing next to the real thing…well, that’s an emotion for which books can only prime us.